Title of the Project CIVIL DIPLOMA 6TH SEMESTER



Title of the Project CIVIL DIPLOMA 6TH SEMESTER

Appendix 6 Format of Synopsis

1. Title of the Project

2. Objectives of the study

3. Rationale for the study

4. Statement of the Problem

5. Detailed Methodology to be used for carrying out the study

6. The expected contribution from the study (to perform any laboratory experiments)

7. List of activities to be carried out to complete the project (with the help of a bar chart showing the time schedule)
8. Places/labs/equipment and tools required and planning of arrangements

9. Problems envisaged in carrying out the project, if any.

10. Brief description of project in 100 words
 
  PROFORMA FOR PROJECT PROPOSAL (Appendix 7)
PROJECT PROPOSAL FORMAT

Name of the Organisation
Programme
Project title:
Names of Project Proponent groups
Area of the project
Project location:
Proposed starting date: Project duration:
Target date of completion
Sponsorors Self / Institute/Government / Industry/ Others
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
BACKGROUND OF THE PROJECT/ SITUATION ANALYSIS
1. What prompted the project?
2. Is there an existing concern or potential problem that you want to address?
Need and Justification of the project

OBJECTIVES OF THE PROJECT
OBJECTIVES STRATEGIES
What does the project hope to achieve? What are the strategies that must be done to meet the objectives?
METHODOLOGY


 

Expected results of the project
 
DESIRED IMPACT AND OUTCOME OF THE PROJECT
I. What are the long term effects of the project? (Economic, social, cultural, institutional, environmental, technological, etc.)
II. What are the specific measures to sustain the project?
III. What are the linkages with other initiatives or reforms in the sector and other development or governance concerns?
Project implementation Plan (Follow up Plan)
(Project work Plan)



**Note: Include Gantt chart if possible
Project Beneficiaries : Number of Beneficiaries from your project:
Location of Beneficiaries:
Budget Requirement Prepared Y/N Project budget:
RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN
I. What are the risks and factors that may hamper or hinder the successful implementation of project activities and achievement of project outputs?
II. What are the measures that would mitigate the adverse effects resulting from such risks?
PROJECT Coordinators Priority
Institution Staff / Industry person name Organisation name Designation Contact Details

 

DETAILED BUDGET REQUIREMENT


Budget Line Item Description Amount








OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION
May include any other information that will support the request for funding, such as:

1. Brief enumeration of other stakeholders who pledged support to the project
2. Other projects that are lined-up to complement the current initiative.
ATTACHMENTS
1. Profile/brochure of the organization
2. Endorsement and recommendation letters
3. Other documents to support the request



Approved Not approved

(a) Name and designation of the Programme In charge

(b) Name and designation of other members (s) involved


Signature of the Programme In charge Signature of the Head/Director/Chairperson Date:-Date:-
Stamp
 
  STYLISTIC AND GRAMMAR ADVICE
Apostrophes
One of the most common mistakes in student writing is incorrect use of the apostrophe (‘), as in PC’s to mean a number of PCs. It is used in English to form contractions such as didn’t (did not), can’t (cannot) and it’s (it is). These uses should be avoided in academic writing and the words written out in full. The apostrophe is also used to denote possessive case, as in the dog’s bone or the student’s assignment. The rule here is that of the intended noun is singular (one dog) the apostrophe is placed before the s. The examples above refer to a single dog and a single student respectively. If the intended noun is plural and regularly formed, the apostrophe is placed before the s as in dogs’ (of the dogs). However if the noun has an irregular plural, e.g. child – children, the apostrophe is placed before the s as in children’s.

Acronyms
Computing/engineering are fields in which acronyms are heavily used to avoid repetition of long technical terms, e.g. RAM, LAN, VDU. Terms like VDU are now so commonly used by the population at large that it is rapidly becoming admissible to use them without explanation. However, most acronyms are familiar only to specialists within sub-fields of computing/engineering. When using an acronym for the first time, always precede it with the expanded version.

Colloquialisms
These are chatty, idiomatic or slang expressions that are appropriate in informal conversion but have no place in your report. For example;
Once Pat pulled his finger out, the team started to come together better and eventually we managed to hand something in that is pretty reasonable considering we didn’t know each other much before this report.
A related point is that in academic and technical writing the use of the first person
‘I’ is avoided as much as possible. In similar way, avoid referring to the reader as ‘you’.

Grammar
Do be careful to write in full sentences and to proof read the document to ensure not only that the text is grammatically sound, but also that it means exactly what was intended.

Jargon
Try to strike a good balance between use of jargon and appropriate use of technical terms. There is no merit in using so much obscure terminology that the document is virtually unreadable, but on the other hand, failure to use key words properly can lead to unnecessary wordiness and tends to give an unprofessional impression. It is important to be consistent in the use of terms, to define them if necessary and to use the same term for the same concept throughout.
Spelling
There should be no excuse for spelling mistakes in a word processed document.
Spelling errors create a bad impression. Always use a spell checker, they are invaluable for picking up typographical errors as well as genuine spelling mistakes. Note, however, that spelling checkers cannot detect cases where the wrong word happens to be a real word e.g. from – form. So a careful proof read is necessary.

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